Chainsaw Safety

Top 6 Chainsaw Safety Tips to Avoid Accidents - ProGardenTips

Chainsaw safety should always be at the top of your mind whenever you fire up your chainsaw. You should always wear the appropriate safety gear, which includes:  proper head & eye protection,  leg chaps, anti-vibration gloves, hearing protection and safety boots. But beyond that, you should continually be learning and practicing proper chainsaw safety operating procedures.



Chainsaw Safety You won’t find a tool with more power per inch than a chainsaw. Power like that requires extra attention to safety. Safety features built into the saw do not replace training in correct chainsaw use, proper cutting technique, caution and common sense.

Forest Storm cleanup – how to stay safe when nature strikes Learn more about after the storm Forest Stay safe and warm – the chainsaw accessories you need to get started When it comes to safety clothing and equipment, different rules and regulations apply in different countries. But no matter where you are, this list of items will enhance your safety when working with chainsaws. Learn more about safety and warmth Forest How to get your chainsaw started Believe it or not, but “how do I start a chainsaw?” is a common question (or at least a frequent Google search) amongst chainsaw users. In this guide we’ve put together some tips on how to get your saw ready to perform. Learn more about starting chainsaws

Working with chainsaws Chainsaw safety tips Working with chainsaws can be dangerous if not used properly. In order to avoid accidents and unnecessary strain, make sure you’re using correct working techniques, the best possible safety equipment and a modern chainsaw with functioning safety features.

In addition to the safety features built into the chainsaw, operators should also wear specific chainsaw safety clothing. Most older saws have few or none of these features, and extra care should be taken in their use.

You won’t find a tool with more power per inch than a chainsaw. Power like that requires extra attention to safety. Safety features built into the saw do not replace training in correct chainsaw use, proper cutting technique, caution and common sense.

Have the necessary tools for this DIY chainsaw safety project lined up before you start—you’ll save time and frustration. Hearing protectionSafety glasses You’ll need a chainsaw (!) and instead of safety glasses and earmuffs, you can wear a helmet with a face screen and built-in ear protection. You’ll also need steel-toed boots, logging chaps and leather gloves.

The Chainsaw Safety Training Clinic is a three-day event designed to help prepare participants for tree removal projects and safety conditions. The training is done in three full-day sessions: Demonstration Safety Training, Hands-On Safety Training, and Limbing, Bucking and Debris Removal. These clinics are held regardless of weather conditions and attendees are asked to come prepared and dressed appropriately. Day 1 – Chainsaw Demonstration Safety Training The Chainsaw Demonstration Safety Training Course covers the basics of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), saw safety features and adjustments; reactive forces, basic directional felling and limbing; and topping. This full-day course will consist of classroom learning in the morning and in the afternoon participants will travel to a site where they will observe the demonstration portion of the training. Day 2 – Chainsaw Hands-On Safety Training The Chainsaw Hands-On Safety Training Course will take place outdoors and will consist of lecture and hands-on activities. The course will include work on springpoles and wedging; hands-on training in carburetor adjustments, chisel bit and round chain filing, as well as other topics. Each Participant will cut down a tree as part of the course. All participants must bring a hard hat, hearing protection, safety glasses, chaps, boots, gloves, safety vest, and a chainsaw (one for every two participants.) Day 3 – Chainsaw Limbing, Bucking and Debris Removal Removing downed trees and debris can be hazardous. This hands-on course will discuss pressures and binds, site information and assessment, recognizing hazard removals, throwline and rope discussions and utilizing springpoles. Participants will be assessing windtrown trees and learning the different techniques of delimbing, topping and bucking. A hard hat, hearing protection, safety glasses, chaps, boots and a chainsaw are also required for this training.

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